What is casual/temporary employment?

The Northern Territory Electoral Commission (NTEC) maintains a register of people who are interested in casual/temporary employment for electoral activities and events.

Positions include: electoral officials in voting centres, mobile voting team members and office administrative support officers. This may involve working at Territory and local government elections, citizenship ceremonies and community engagement activities (e.g. enrolment promotion stands at NT shows).

No prior electoral experience is necessary. All casual/temporary positions receive on-the-job and/or formal training. Depending on the position and circumstances, employment may involve working during business hours, weekends, after hours or for extended periods, including travel to remote locations.

Pay is based on a package or hourly rate depending on expected hours and type of work. Some positions are available in regional centres or may involve travelling in remote locations.

NOTE: NTEC employees MUST be registered on the electoral roll and cannot be, or seen to be, politically active.

To apply for all casual/temporary positions, complete an expression of interest for employment. The form is an expression of interest only and, if suitable, you will be contacted for a short interview. Completing the expression of interest form does not in any way guarantee that the NTEC will consider you for, or offer you, employment.  

If you agree, your details can be forwarded to the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) for consideration for work at federal elections.

Rates of pay  NB: Pay rates are subject to change.

Frequ​ently asked questions

These questions apply to casual/temporary employment.

What is an expres​sion of interest (EOI)?

An expression of interest is used to gather and collate information on persons looking for short-term election-related employment. The background information and details you provide will support an assessment on merit as to your work-related qualities; including, transferable skills and abilities, relevant personal qualities, the ability to contribute to a team environment, and the abilitiy to relate to a diverse electorate. Your EOI will be considered in conjunction with others and an order of merit determined. Interviews may be conducted in an NTEC office or by telephone.

Do I need to provide details of referees?

The names and contact details of two referees may be required to support your EOI.

Will I receive ackno​wledgement of receipt of my EOI?

Expressions of interest for temporary employment will not be acknowledged.

What if my personal ​details change after submitting an EOI?

Advise the NTEC of your updated personal details and, if necessary, complete a new expression of interest form. If updating your details includes a change of name and/or address, please complete an enrolment form or update your enrolment details online at www.aec.gov.au

What if I'm offered tem​porary employment?

You will be sent a formal offer of employment together with other employment-related forms to complete and return.

Will I receive trai​ning?

Certain types of electoral officials are required to attend formal training sessions and undertake home study using training manuals. On-the job training and support is provided.

Temporary employm​ent categories

Voting centre managers and support staff

There are two categories of electoral officials:

  • those required to work in the period immediately prior to election day to assist with early voting and mobile voting
  • those required to work in a voting centre on election day only.
  • Electoral officials - early or mobile voting

Electoral officials working at early voting centres (EVC) or on mobile voting teams are advised of the hours of duty when an offer of employment is made.

Mobile voting officials may be required anywhere from one day (mobile voting at urban hospitals, care facilities and correctional institutions) up to seven days visiting communities in remote areas. Remote voting takes place in the two weeks prior to election day as well as on election day, in accordance with a published timetable.

EVC officials issue ballot material to electors who cannot attend a voting centre on election day.

Electoral officials - election day

Electoral officials working at a voting centre are advised of the hours of duty when an offer of employment is made. Work can commence as early as 7:00 am and electoral officials are required to remain on duty after 6:00 pm until work at the voting centre is completed (i.e. the count of ballot papers).

Officer-in-charge (OIC)

OICs are responsible for the management and the conduct of voting at a voting centre.

Responsibilities include inspecting and setting up the voting centre, checking and receipting all election materials, supervising voting centre staff, and packing/returning materials. On election day, a preliminary scrutiny or examination and count of ballot papers may be required, receipt and checking of all election materials, supervising electoral staff in their duties, packaging and returning materials to head office. On election day, a preliminary scrutiny or examination and count of ballot papers may be required.

Second-in-charge (2IC)

A 2IC is employed, mainly in larger voting centres, to assist the OIC with voting and counting duties. The 2IC may provide relief for other electoral staff as required.

Declaration vote issuing officer

The duties of a declaration vote issuing officer include issuing ballot papers to electors who:

  • are absent from their enrolled division on election day (absent vote)
  • cannot be found on the electronic certified list, for the division the voting centre is located in (unenrolled vote)
  • cannot be found on the electronic certified list and claim to be enrolled for another division (absent vote)
  • have already been marked off the electronic certified list (already-marked-as-voted).
Enquiry officer

An enquiry officer attends to the needs of voters waiting in the queue, assists voters who require help with voting and assist with the count of ballot papers after voting centres close.

Ordinary issuing officer

Ordinary issuing officers issue ballot papers to voters who attend a voting centre and whose names are found on the electronic certified list. Duties include marking the elector off the electronic certified list as having voted, completing the account of ballot papers and assisting with the count of ballot papers after voting centres close.

Ballot box guard

Ballot box guards supervise ballot boxes to ensure that voters place their ballot papers in the correct box, direct people to the exit and assist with the count of ballot papers after voting centres close.

Queue controller

Queue controllers organise voters into a single queue, direct voters to issuing points, ensure electors voting outside their area are directed to declaration issuing points, identify voters who require assistance and help with the count of ballot papers after voting centres close.

Mobile voting teams

Mobile voting officials may be required for one day’s mobile voting in urban hospitals, care facilities and correctional institutions, or up to seven days visiting mostly Aboriginal communities in remote areas. Remote voting takes place in the two weeks prior to and on election day, in accordance with a published timetable.

Persons expressing an interest in this type of electoral work MUST be able to demonstrate cultural awareness and sensitivity, be able to work as part of a team and have the ability and willingness to travel in light aircraft, 4WD vehicles and/or boats.

Team leader

The mobile voting team leader is responsible for managing the team and the conduct of voting at the mobile voting location/s.

Responsibilities include checking and receipting all election materials, inspection and setting up the voting centre, supervising electoral staff, conducting the count of ballot papers, and reconciling, packing/returning materials.

Second in charge (2IC)

The 2IC is employed to issue ballot papers and to assist the mobile voting team leader with voting and counting duties, including providing relief for the mobile voting team leader as required.

Team member

Mobile voting team members are employed to issue ballot papers and to assist the mobile voting team leader with conducting the count and packing/returning materials.

Indigenous linguist (translator)

Indigenous linguists are highly sought after to provide local language interpretation. A speaker of an indigenous language who is able to translate and transcribe their language accurately from prescribed English material can help electoral officials communicate clear, accurate and timely voting information. This work may also include assisting in the development of support materials like posters and radio/television advertisements targeted at remote communities.

An indigenous linguist must also be able to make decisions about what to translate and what to reject - sound judgment is, therefore, essential. A keen interest in community affairs is a major advantage. It is vital that translators have strong analytical and interpretive skills to be able to be able to produce accurate translations.

Administrative support

Office assistant

Office assistants are engaged on a 'needs' basis to assist permanent electoral staff on election related tasks. Hours may be temporary or casual. Only persons available during normal business hours for extended periods are advised to apply.Events include Legislative Assembly and local government elections, enrolment information stands at shows, citizenship ceremonies, and fee-for-service elections.

Workloads vary and there are no guarantees as to the nature or duration of the work on a particular day. Casual office assistants are engaged at the manager’s discretion and may not be required for duty after a specific task is completed. As a general rule, office assistants work during normal business hours; however, due to deadlines imposed during an election there may be a requirement to work during evenings and/or weekends and public holidays.Casual assistants may also be employed to help set-up and dismantle voting screens, unfold ballot papers, package material and tidy the office or voting centre.

Postal voting officer

A postal voting officer issues ballot papers to voters who have applied for a postal vote. Postal voting officer positions can be located in Darwin and regional centres throughout the Territory and usually involve temporary employment for two weeks prior to election day. Officers work during normal business hours; however, may be required to work during evenings and/or weekends and public holidays to meet election deadlines.